Thursday, February 07th, 2013 | Author:

Scratch Pic

My scratch link:

http://scratch.mit.edu/projects/jdosch/3089325

I spent so much time on this “Scratch Website” this week, I am going to focus my blog on that and answer the questions posed by Dr. Coffman.

What types of problems did you have to solve to create your program?

What problems didn’t I encounter?  I had to go about making 2 full video shorts because in the first one I couldn’t figure out how to get my sprite to reappear back on the page, and then I couldn’t figure out how to save it properly.  I don’t feel that this website is as intuitive as I’d like it to be.  I found myself constantly going back to the tutorials to “see how to do” whatever it was I was trying to accomplish.  It was extremely frustrating to spend so much time on something that looked so childish and mediocre.  Even looking through the site at some of the other projects people posted, I was not impressed by the majority of them.

How did you approach designing your program? Did you sit down and think about what you wanted and what you would need to build your program?

I first sat down (after watching several tutorials) and started playing around with the different features.  I played around with the different sections and then decided to make something simple because I realized this is something that would drive me crazy because I am a bit of a perfectionist.

What are your take-a-ways?

As a perfectionist this type of program is no good.  I could spend at least a week trying to perfect a video in scratch, and still not get “it right”.  If I did suggest this tool to my students I would tell them not to over think or overdo it, but to view it as a fun little resource to restate a main point (whether it is in game, video, or some other format).

I don’t like that I can’t export the videos and I can only paste a link.  I would much rather be able to past in my video somewhere rather than include a like to it.

My favorite moment, however, was when my 6 year old watched my scratch and told me it was for babies and that babies could do this.  I was tempted to let her play around with it, but unfortunately it was her bedtime.  I don’t doubt that she would find this much easier to navigate than myself.  Maybe if we find some extra time one day I’ll sit her down and show her how to use it, and before long she’ll be telling me how it really works.  This made me wonder what secondary students might really think about this tool.

How will this aid in your teaching?

I don’t see this aiding in my own teaching, but I think it would be a great tool to offer up to students.  Personally it is not something that worked for me, but if my students want to use it and it works for them, then by all means I won’t be the one to stop them.

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Category: indt501
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  1. ctrumbetic says:

    I 10000000% agree with your statement, “As a perfectionist, this type of program is no good”. It took me two hours to get my program to look the way it does and I don’t have colors or constant movement like you, so I can only imagine that it took you a very long time. I agree with your view that it might not aid in teaching in the classroom. As an instruction tool, I think it would be useful in the primary grades, but in secondary grades probably not because of its limited functions. I think it would be most beneficial as a tool to use for a project in a secondary classroom, but it would require a lot on instruction to really have the students have a meaningful learning experience.